Economy / Events / Impact / Nations

World Cup Watching

Resources

Professor Simon Chadwick

Posted: May 23, 2018

A SHORT GUIDE TO FOLLOWING – RESOURCES

WHAT IT IS

Resources are: “Economic or productive factors required to accomplish an activity, or as a means to undertake an enterprise and achieve desired outcomes. The three most basic resources and land, labour and capital, though other resources can include energy supplies, entrepreneurship, information, expertise, management and time.”  (businessdictionary.com, 2018)

WHY IT IS IMPORTANT

Russia, principally via partly state-owned or previously privatised corporations, has in recent times used football as a means through which to, for example, sell gas supplies to other states. That Russia’s Gazprom is sponsoring this tournament is telling. At the same time, China has been proving highly adept at utilising stadium diplomacy as a strategy of gaining access to scarce natural resources. Again, one should note the number of sponsors from China now involved in the World Cup. Yet these countries are not alone in doing this, hence this summer resources will be a hot topic: 1) because the Russian government and the country’s corporations (including Gazprom, which is a FIFA partner) has proved highly adept at putting football centre-stage in its resource diplomacy; 2) because several other countries, notably China (but also including Qatar and Saudi Arabia) are similarly utilising football as a means through which to address matters pertaining to natural resources.

SOME QUESTIONS TO ASK

Will resource diplomacy be a feature of this summer’s World Cup and, if it is, how will it manifest itself?

To what extent is Russia’s hosting of the 2018 World Cup an enabler in helping the country to engage with key resource consumers, notably countries such as Germany and China?

Will this World Cup serve as a central node in a dense network of competing resource interests that involves countries including Saudi Arabia, Iran, the United States and Russia?

SOMETHING TO READ

China and Qatar’s stadium stadium https://www.policyforum.net/china-qatars-stadium-diplomacy/

Energy sector using soccer power to drive global industry growth http://www.ejinsight.com/20170919-energy-sector-using-soccer-power-to-drive-global-industry-growth/

How China is fuelling the African Cup of Nations through stadium diplomacy http://www.scmp.com/sport/soccer/article/2061186/how-china-fuelling-african-cup-nations-through-stadium-diplomacy

How Russia has devoted its energy to the beautiful game https://theconversation.com/how-russia-has-devoted-its-energy-to-the-beautiful-game-46174

 

 

About Professor Simon Chadwick

Simon is Professor of Sports Enterprise at Salford University in Manchester (UK), where he is also a Co-Director of the Centre for Sports Business. He is also a Founding Co-Director of the China Soccer Observatory and a Senior Fellow of the China Policy Institute at the University of Nottingham (UK). He has worked in football across the world, for various organisations including companies, federations, and governments. He tweets via @Prof_Chadwick